Christ Can Heal Any Situation

The story of Jesus raising a young girl from the dead is not only a miracle but a powerful illustration for contemporary Christians. It reminds us that nothing is beyond the power or scope of Jesus. Let’s quickly look at the corresponding Scriptures for this story.

Matt 9:18, 19. The synagogue was a place where local Jews went for worship and fellowship. It was a place for Orthodox Judaism. Interestingly, Jairus (Mark 5:22), the Jewish leader asked Jesus to heal his daughter. Notice this Jewish official sought Jesus after the child was dead. In fact, the funeral music was already playing! Yet Jesus touched her and she arose from the dead (Matt 9:23-23). As a synagogue leader, it is obvious he followed the Jewish customs and beliefs. After all, this public display for a personal request is stating the man had faith in Jesus healing his daughter. This leader could have gone to the priest for help but he did not. Either the man was desperate or he knew there was more to Jesus than he previously had known. Interestingly, Mark records this interaction with more passion. Mark 5:23 states Jairus pleaded “fervently” with Jesus. Jarius also knew Jesus espoused similar but contrarian philosophical and theological beliefs.

Mark 5:35-43. The fact that Jesus entered Jarius’ house could have possibly created a scandal. Nevertheless, Jesus dared to not only enter Jarius’ house but he broke the custom by touching an unclean person. The child was dead and Jews were forbidden from touching dead people. Jesus showed his power and authority over customs and nature itself. Speaking in Aramaic, Jesus told or commanded the child to get up.[1]  Similar to how Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead, he demonstrated that death had to obey his commands. History does not record how this miracle changed Jarius’ household, the synagogue he led, or the people who witnessed Jesus’ power. From a 20th Century perspective, one would surmised followers of The Way would have increased in number. Further, the knowledge of Jesus’ mighty act would have spread even faster. Obviously, this is mere conjecture. Unlike other Or, perhaps the crowd followed Jesus’ instruction not to tell anyone. Said differently, the remained silent on the issue.

The story of the young child is not about healing situations. Yet, we can see applications for it in today’s time. Today’s Christians are not commanded to remain silent on the miracles Jesus has performed in their lives. Has God transformed your marriage?  Has He touched your son or daughter and brought them back into the fold of Christ? Have you witnessed any miracles that you haven’t shared? Is there something that looks bleak and you don’t know how to handle it? Seek God and ask him to heal your situation.

As always, let me know how it is going with you. Let us continue to share the Good News of Christ and the many wonderful things He is doing in our lives. We desperately need your help in sharing because the false narrative is increasing. We need your help in “discipline all Nations” (Matt 28:19). Share the good things about your faith and your love for God.

Solus Christus

Yves

[1] This author has not discovered a reasonable understanding why Jesus chose to speak to the child in Aramaic.

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Yves Johnson is a Leadership Trainer, Consultant, Keynote Speaker, and Author. He has written two books and a varied collection of articles and blogs. He is the President of Christ Is My Savior Ministries, a nonprofit focusing on training and equipping Christians and Christian leaders on strengthening their walk with Christ. Yves is also the CEO of CornerStone Leadership Consulting. CornerStone provides leadership training and consulting services to business leaders on producing optimal employee work performance and resiliency. He’s a sought out speaker and offers a wide range of leadership and development seminars for Faith-Based organizations and private organizations. You can find his books at http://ow.ly/B4aGp

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